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We know hand dryers can circulate germs through the air. Why are they still used everywhere?

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Airborne contaminants, dirty toilet seats, mould and mildew: long before the coronavirus pandemic came around, the hygiene-focused among us knew public washrooms are grimy places.


Originally published in The Conversation.

Growing up in a rough neighbourhood can shape kids' brains, so good parenting and schooling is crucial

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Growing up in a poor or disadvantaged neighbourhood can affect the way adolescents’ brains function, according to our new research.


Originally published in The Conversation.

After the Ever Given: what the ship wedged in the Suez Canal means for global trade

In the early hours of March 23, the container ship Ever Given was blown off course by high winds on its way through the Suez Canal. At 400 metres long, the Ever Given is longer than the canal is wide, and the ship became wedged firmly in both banks, completely blocking traffic.


Originally published in The Conversation.

After the floods, stand by for spiders, slugs and millipedes – but think twice before reaching for the bug spray

Lukas Koch / AAP

Record-breaking rain has destroyed properties across New South Wales, forcing thousands of people to evacuate and leavin


Originally published in The Conversation.

Evolutionary study suggests prehistoric human fossils 'hiding in plain sight' in Southeast Asia

A Homo erectus skull from Java, Indonesia. This pioneering species stands at the root of a fascinating evolutionary tree. Scimex

Island Southeast Asia has one of the largest and most intriguing hominin fossil records in the world.


Originally published in The Conversation.

What is a 1 in 100 year weather event? And why do they keep happening so often?

People living on the east coast of Australia have been experiencing a rare meteorological event. Record-breaking rainfall in some regions, and very heavy and sustained rainfall in others, has led to significant flooding.

In different places, this has been described as a one in 30, one in 50 or one in 100 year event. So, what does this mean?


Originally published in The Conversation.

Climate explained: how particles ejected from the Sun affect Earth's climate

Earth's magnetic field protects us from the solar wind, guiding the solar particles to the polar regions. SOHO (ESA & NASA)

The Conversation.

When our evolutionary ancestors first crawled onto land, their brains only half-filled their skulls

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Most of us would recognise a human brain, but what about the brain of a frog or fish? Given the vast diversity of life on Earth, there are some weird and wonderful brains out there.


Originally published in The Conversation.

Apps against sexual violence have been tried before. They don't work

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Yesterday, New South Wales Police Commissioner Mick Fuller suggested technology should be part of the solution to growing concerns around se


Originally published in The Conversation.

Curious Kids: how do freezers work?

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How does the freezer work? — Leon, aged 4


Originally published in The Conversation.