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Holding the world to ransom: the top 5 most dangerous criminal organisations online right now

Shutterstock

On the internet, nobody knows you’re a dog!


Originally published in The Conversation.

Why do kids hate going to sleep, while adults usually love it?

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The school holidays are here, and parents struggling to get their children to bed will no doubt be thinking: what is wrong with you? I would do anything to get more sleep!


Originally published in The Conversation.

What does it take to do a spacewalk? Skill, courage, and being able to wear a men's size medium

NASA/AP

On June 25, astronauts Shane Kimbrough and Thomas Pesquet successfully completed an almost seven-hour EVA (extravehicular activity, or spa


Originally published in The Conversation.

The North American heatwave shows we need to know how climate change will change our weather

NASA

Eight days ago, it rained over the western Pacific Ocean near Japan. There was nothing especially remarkable about this rain event, yet it made big waves twice.


Originally published in The Conversation.

Curious Kids: is light a wave or a particle?

Shutterstock

Is light a wave or particle? — Ishan, age 15, Dubai


Originally published in The Conversation.

The scientific genius who eschewed fame: remembering Thomas Harriot, 400 years on

Rita Greer, FAL

Four hundred years ago, on July 2 1621, a remarkable Englishman named Thomas Harriot died in Lon


Originally published in The Conversation.

What is daydreaming? Parts of the brain show sleep-like activity when your mind wanders

Shutterstock

Our attention is a powerful lens, allowing our brains to pick out the relevant details out of the overwhelming flow of information reaching us every second.


Originally published in The Conversation.

We discovered a new fossil species of horseshoe crab (and named it after David Attenborough)

Katrina Kenny, Author provided

There are only four known species of horseshoe crabs alive today. But the fossil record shows that hundreds of millions of years ago they came in a huge range of shapes and sizes.


Originally published in The Conversation.

'Laws of nature turned up to 11': astronomers spot two neutron stars being swallowed by black holes

Carl Knox/OzGrav/Swinburne Univ.

One of the best things about being an astronomer is being able to discover something new about the universe. In fact, maybe the only thing better is discovering it twice.


Originally published in The Conversation.