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We could lose $30 billion in weeks from cyberwar. But the real loss is the erosion of public trust

The Australian Cyber Security Growth Network (AustCyber) on Monday released a report modelling the potential impact of cyberattacks and sustained digital outages on Australia.

The Digital Trust Report’s modelling suggests four weeks of partial “digital disruption” could displace up to 163,000 jobs and damage the economy to the tune of A$30 billion.


Originally published in The Conversation.

Ultraviolet radiation is a strong disinfectant. It may be what our schools, hospitals and airports need

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You may remember when US President Donald Trump suggested exposing coronavirus patients to UV (ultraviolet) light – or “just very powerful light” – to help treat them.


Originally published in The Conversation.

Our cybersecurity isn't just under attack from foreign states. There are holes in the government's approach

Prime Minister Scott Morrison revealed last month Australia is actively being attacked by hostile foreign governments.


Originally published in The Conversation.

Parler: what you need to know about the 'free speech' Twitter alternative

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Amid claims of social media platforms stifling free speech, a new challenger called Parler is The Conversation.

Did ancient Americans settle in Polynesia? The evidence doesn't stack up

Andres Moreno-Estrada

How did the Polynesian peoples come to live on the far-flung islands of the Pacific? The question has intrigued researchers for centuries.


Originally published in The Conversation.

Howzat! We can all learn from elite batsmen, and not just about cricket

While many people may enjoy a game of backyard cricket, only a few go on to become elite professional batsmen in Australia.

Cricket batting is example of what human skills can achieve. The fastest bowling delivery speeds can exceed 150km/h. That leaves a batsman with less than half a second to react.

And to complicate the challenge even further, the environment and pitch they play on can change the trajectory of the delivery every time.


Originally published in The Conversation.

Large-scale facial recognition is incompatible with a free society

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In the US, tireless opposition to state use of facial recognition algorithms has recently won some victories.


Originally published in The Conversation.

'Living fossils': we mapped half a billion years of horseshoe crabs to save them from blood harvests

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If you ventured to the New York seaside in summer, you might see a large dome-shaped animal with a spiky tail, slowly moving towards the water. These are horseshoe crabs – the animals time forgot.


Originally published in The Conversation.

China could be using TikTok to spy on Australians, but banning it isn’t a simple fix

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In an age of isolation, video sharing platform TikTok has emerged as a bonding force for many.


Originally published in The Conversation.