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The Doping Age

The Doping Age

By Stephen Moston & Terry Engelberg

A new study finds that doping in sport has spread to Australian athletes as young as 12 years of age.

The full text of this article can be purchased from Informit.

For those of us who like to read our newspapers from the back pages first, the endless succession of stories of doping by elite athletes has almost lost the power to shock. The motives of elite athletes for doping are generally easy to understand: fame, fortune and sometimes an overwhelming desire to win. Nothing new there; move on to the next story.

It’s easy to see each new case of doping as the failings of the individual athlete – the bad apple in an otherwise good barrel. Even when a lot of bad apples come from one barrel – the sport of cycling comes most readily to mind – we still see little cause for concern. The spirit of sport as an honest, healthy pursuit is only slightly tarnished. The offenders are punished, removed from competition and the games go on.

Doping is defined in terms of the occurrence of one or more of the eight anti-doping rule violations specified in the World Anti-Doping Code. This includes violations such as the presence of a prohibited substance or its metabolites or markers in an athlete’s bodily specimen; and refusing, or failing without compelling justification, to submit to sample collection after notification; possession of prohibited substances and methods. Doping is not restricted to the use of performance enhancing drugs, it now includes other illicit drugs that are generally not performance enhancing but are potentially...

The full text of this article can be purchased from Informit.