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Hypersonic Art

scramjet

The scramjet is a unique engine that breathes oxygen, has no moving parts, and is designed to operate at hypersonic speeds. Source: Centre for Hypersonics, University of Queensland

By Tara Roberson

An artist with a passion for bringing the abstract and strange to life, Peter Hennessey has immersed himself in the world of hypersonics, and given researchers a fresh perspective about their work.

The full text of this article can be purchased from Informit.

Peter Hennessey is best-known for his space-inspired artworks, including My Voyager (2004) and My Hubble: The Universe Turns on Itself (2010). Now, as artist-in-resident at The University of Queensland’s Centre for Hypersonics, he has explored engineering as a science and an art.

Hypersonic aerodynamics has been a major research activity at the university for more than 20 years. Within the UQ Centre for Hypersonics, the HyShot Group has been working to produce an engine with some remarkable features. The aptly named Scramjet engine breathes oxygen, has no moving parts, and is designed to operate at hypersonic speeds of around 8600 km/h, or eight times the speed of sound).

The exhibition Peter Hennessey: Making It Real encompasses the past 10 years of the artist’s practice, illuminating key themes in his work and including new artworks that have been produced as part of his residency.

The...

The full text of this article can be purchased from Informit.