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MRI: Window into the brain

By Sila Genc

Magnetic Resonance Imaging, or MRI, has revolutionized modern medicine, allowing us to see detailed structure of the human brain. PhD students Charles Malpas and Bernd Merkel discuss their research into applying MRI as a tool to investigate diseased and healthy brains to help fine tune our understanding of how the brain works.

The full text of this article can be purchased from Informit.

SILA GENC
Hello and welcome to Up Close. I’m Sila Genc, thanks for joining us.
Magnetic Resonance Imaging, or MRI, has revolutionised modern medicine, allowing us to see into the window of the human body. MRI of the brain has allowed for many different investigations of structure and function of certain regions of the brain, anywhere from visualising a stroke lesion to recognising abnormal function in epilepsy.
Over the decades MRI research has answered many questions into the development of the human brain and how this can be disrupted by pathology and disease processes. But many questions still remain unanswered. Are there discrete structural and functional relationships between different parts of the brain in healthy individuals, and how does this change with ageing and cognitive impairment?
Joining us today on Up Close for our annual PhD episode are two researchers who are exploring the complexity of the brain with Magnetic Resonance Imaging techniques.
Later in the program we will be talking to Bernd Merkel about the volumetric and structural changes seen by MRI in cognitively impaired individuals and how this can be impacted by lifestyle factors. But first we are...

The full text of this article can be purchased from Informit.