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The Cosmic Ties that Bind Us

The results of a computer simulation of a cold dark matter universe.

The results of a computer simulation of a cold dark matter universe. Ordinary matter, in the form of stars and gas, is held to the dark matter via gravity and flows along filaments towards the largest local mass. The alignment of satellite galaxies around the Milky Way and Andromeda galaxies is a direct consequence of the filamentary nature of the universe.

By Stefan Keller

Astronomers have found a filament of ancient stars and galaxies that joins us to neighbouring clusters of galaxies and beyond to the vast interconnected universe.

Stefan Keller is a Research Fellow at the Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics of the Australian National University, where he is the Operational Scientist for the SkyMapper telescope.

The full text of this article can be purchased from Informit.

A Matter of Life & Death

Platelets are produced in the bone marrow by cells called megakaryocytes.	iStock

Platelets are produced in the bone marrow by cells called megakaryocytes. iStockphoto

By Vanessa Solomon, Benjamin Kile & Emma Josefsson

Discovering the factors that control the lifespan of the cells that form blood clots could improve cancer treatments and extend the shelf-life of blood donations.

Vanessa Solomon, Benjamin Kile and Emma Josefsson are based at The Walter & Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research.

The full text of this article can be purchased from Informit.

The Thylacine Myth

Two Tasmanian tigers in Hobart Zoo prior to 1921. Photographer unknown.

Two Tasmanian tigers in Hobart Zoo prior to 1921. Photographer unknown.

By Marie Attard & Stephen Wroe

A new study of the biomechanics of the Tasmanian tiger’s skull debunks the hysteria behind the campaign that led to its extinction.

Marie Attard is a postgraduate student studying the diet of Tasmanian tigers at the University of NSW School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, where Stephen Wroe is a Senior Research Fellow and the director of the Computational Biomechanics Research Group.

The full text of this article can be purchased from Informit.

Losing Weight Subconsciously

The sympathetic nervous system subconsciously regulates blood pressure, metabolism, digestion, respiration and body temperature.

The sympathetic nervous system subconsciously regulates blood pressure, metabolism, digestion, respiration and body temperature.

By Nora Straznicky & Elisabeth Lambert

Individuals vary widely in their ability to lose weight, with new evidence suggesting that up to 45% of the variability in weight loss is caused by individual differences in subconscious nerve activity.

Nora Straznicky and Elisabeth Lambert are research scientists in the Baker IDI Heart & Diabetes Institute’s Human Neurotransmitters Laboratory.

The full text of this article can be purchased from Informit.

Is It Better Never to Have Been Born?

By Michael Cook

Bioethicists are questioning legal judgements that dismiss “wrongful birth” cases by challenging the belief that it is better to be born than not born.

Michael Cook is editor of the online bioethics news service, BioEdge.

The full text of this article can be purchased from Informit.

Laying Clean Energy Foundations

By Ian Lowe

A review finds that Australia is a late adopter of clean energy.

Ian Lowe is Emeritus Professor of science, technology and society at Griffith University.

The full text of this article can be purchased from Informit.

A Corridor to Where?

By Carina Wyborn

Connectivity conservation has been framed as a positive contribution that individuals can make in the face of the dual crisis of biodiversity loss and climate change. What is it and why should we pay attention?

Carina Wyborn is a PhD student working on the social dimensions of connectivity science. She is based at the Australian National University and is associated with the Environmental Decisions Group.

The full text of this article can be purchased from Informit.

Nomadic Gnome Solving Weighty Problem

By Magdeline Lum

A gnome is travelling the world to test for subtle differences in gravity.

The full text of this article can be purchased from Informit.

Close Enough Is Better Than Nothing

By Peter Bowditch

Peer review may not be perfect but it’s better than the alternative of being able to say, claim and publish anything at all.

Peter Bowditch is a former President of Australian Skeptics Inc. (www.skeptics.com.au).

The full text of this article can be purchased from Informit.

Dying Stars Leave Dusty Trails

By David Reneke

News from the space and astronomy communities around the world.

David Reneke is an astronomy lecturer and teacher, a feature writer for major Australian newspapers and magazines, and a science correspondent for ABC and commercial radio. Subscribe to David’s free Astro-Space newsletter at www.davidreneke.com

The full text of this article can be purchased from Informit.