Australasian Science: Australia's authority on science since 1938

Complete

Exclusive subscriber content

By Stephen Luntz

Subscribe online for access to full Australasian Science content.

To view this article subscribe or purchase a yearly pass here.

Garbage Guts

Photo: Denice Askebrink

A healthy adult hawksbill turtle checking out divers in the Maldives. Photo: Denice Askebrink

By Blake Chapman

Why are turtles attempting to eat shopping bags, balloons and other forms of human rubbish in preference to natural food sources?

Dr Blake Chapman completed her PhD in marine biology and neuroscience at The University of Queensland, and is a freelance science communicator.

To view this article subscribe or purchase a yearly pass here.

Will Your Smart Meter Make You Less Smart?

By Peter Bowditch

The introduction of smart electricity meters has led to some silly public misconceptions.

Peter Bowditch is a former President of Australian Skeptics Inc. (www.skeptics.com.au).

To view this article subscribe or purchase a yearly pass here.

Citizen Scientists Find Exoplanet

By David Reneke

News from the space and astronomy communities around the world.

David Reneke is an astronomy lecturer and teacher, a feature writer for major Australian newspapers and magazines, and a science correspondent for ABC and commercial radio. Subscribe to David’s free Astro-Space newsletter at www.davidreneke.com

To view this article subscribe or purchase a yearly pass here.

Four Academies Are Working Together

By Robin Batterham

Australia’s four learned academies are integrating their expertise in science, technology, social science and humanities to form a better evidence base for advice to government.

Professor Robin Batterham AO FREng FAA FTSE finishes his term as President of ATSE in December. He is a former Chief Scientist for Australia and was Rio Tinto’s most senior scientist before taking his current appointment as the Kernot Professor of Engineering at the University of Melbourne.

To view this article subscribe or purchase a yearly pass here.

How Hepatitis Escapes the Immune System

Credit: Frederic Sierro

The liver’s unusual cellular architecture makes blood flow slower than in other organs. Perforations of the lining of the blood vessels within the liver allow a unique contact between the circulating blood cells (red) and the liver cells (green), and explains why activated T cells (blue) are efficiently retained in the liver. Credit: Frederic Sierro

By Patrick Bertolino and David Bowen

Recent discoveries about the unusual behaviour of immune cells in the liver could open the way to new strategies for transplantation and the treatment of viral hepatitis.

Patrick Bertolino and David Bowen are co-heads of the Liver Immunology group at the Centenary Institute in Sydney.

To view this article subscribe or purchase a yearly pass here.

Know Your Enemy

iStockphoto

Credit: iStockphoto

By Hsei Di Law

New research has revealed a key mechanism by which our immune system turns against us.

Hsei Di Law is a research technician at the John Curtin School of Medical Research, The Australian National University.

To view this article subscribe or purchase a yearly pass here.

Take a Closer Look at that Christmas Card

By Magdeline Lum

Many Christmas cards and decorations have incorrect depictions of the Moon and snowflakes.

To view this article subscribe or purchase a yearly pass here.

I Can Feel Your Pain

iStockphoto

Empathy for pain has conceptual commonalities with synaesthesia. Credit: iStockphoto

By John Bradshaw

Empathy for someone else’s pain shares common characteristics with synaesthesia, a sensory condition where individuals can smell music or taste colours.

John Bradshaw is Emeritus Professor of Neuropsychology at Monash University. This article is adapted from a script broadcast on Ockham’s Razor, and has been updated with additional information from Bernadette Fitzgibbon.

To view this article subscribe or purchase a yearly pass here.

Green Is Mean and White Is Nice

By Stephen Luntz

Public understanding of rip research is saving Australian lives each summer.

To view this article subscribe or purchase a yearly pass here.