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Articles related to psychology

Browse: Gender Behaviours Inherited from Social Environment
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Feature: Neurogenesis in the Emotion-Processing Centre of the Brain
The generation of neurons during adulthood can affect our behaviour and alter our mood, so the discovery that this occurs in the amygdala could lead to new strategies for the treatment of anxiety-related disorders.
Browse: Nutrition’s Role in Early Psychosis Treatment Browse: Social Isolation Can Hasten Tumour Growth
Browse: Gel Can End Blushing
As much as a quarter of the population is frightened of blushing, and many of them may avoid situations in which they fear their cheeks will give them away. Prof Peter Drummond of Murdoch University’s Psychology Department thinks that an easily available gel may be the answer.
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Feature: More Than Just a Game
Excessive video gamers have the same physiological disturbances and disrupted thought processes as those addicted to substances and gambling.
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Cover Story: The Emerging Potential of Video Games
A growing body of research is finding that video games stimulate the brain, but are the skills acquired transferable and is violence in games really an issue?
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Feature: Positive Minds Wire Our Brains for Tough Times
Positive feelings are linked to brain development in teenagers, giving neuroscientists insights into why people differ in their resilience to stress and other mental health conditions later in life.
Feature: Why Haven’t We Cured Addiction Yet?
Millions of people are struggling with addictions to smoking, drinking and drugs, but the search for new medications to help them quit remains elusive. Here’s why.
Feature: Confronting the Fear of Blushing
Fear of blushing is complex, but help is closer at hand now that the origin of this fear is becoming clear.
Browse: Buying into Feelings of Insecurity
Women who are vulnerable to media-generated insecurity about their bodies buy more shoes and handbags.
Browse: Alcohol Availability Makes Sexual Assault More Likely
Browse: Scans Reveal Brain Changes in ADHD Browse: Air pollution linked to brain alterations and cognitive impairment in children
Browse: Want to Remember Your Dreams? Try Taking Vitamin B6 conSCIENCE: Is “Mentally Ill” the New Normal?
Drug treatments for behaviours that were previously not considered mental health conditions raise several unintended consequences.
The Bitter Pill: Too Open to Ideas?
Why do intelligent people believe incredible things? Psychological studies suggest that the answer may lie in personality type rather than any measure of intelligence.
The Bitter Pill: Anti-Vaccination and CAM Reflect a Common Worldview
A study has explored the psychosocial factors driving anti-vaccination attitudes.
Neuropsy: Girlfriend, Where’s My Car?
Men and women use different strategies to find their car, with different degrees of success.
Neuropsy: Send in the Creepy Clowns
Fear of clowns may result from an evolutionary adaptive “creepiness detector”.
Neuropsy: Rise and Shine, Soldier!
Army research suggests that the timing of your caffeine hit is more important than the amount consumed.
Out of this World: Siding Spring Observatory Survives Fire Threat
Most of Australia stood mesmerised in January as a fire raged across the Warrumbungle National Park in NSW, which is home to Australia’s world-class optical and infrared telescopes at Siding Spring Observatory.
Publish or Perish: Books: We Write, Read, Love, Need Them
Why write books? For some, it's a need — to find out what we think, and get the record down for all of history to see. And in science, there's the need to update what's known, something Emeritus Professor John Bradshaw has done.
Quandary: Adventures on the Dark Side
Cases of sexual attraction are bound to grow as “genetic orphans” seek out their missing parents.
Simon Says: Not Understanding Terror
Science is not up to the challenge of divining the behavioural roots of Islamic terrorism.
Up Close: Susan Greenfield: Fifty shades of grey matter
Neuroscientist and synaptic pharmacologist Prof Baroness Susan Greenfield discusses how neuroscience sheds light on our understanding of consciousness.
Up Close: Carrots that stick: Rethinking pleasure and pain as human motivators
Social psychologist Prof E. Tory Higgins discusses his model of how humans interpret and appreciate reward and punishment, and offers unusual approaches to motivate people to action.
Up Close: Prey to temptation: Our struggle with irrational health choices
Social epidemiologist Prof Ichiro Kawachi describes how mental short-cuts affect our health choices, often for the worse, and what can be done to help us make better choices. Presented by Dr Dyani Lewis.
Up Close: Prey to temptation: Our struggle with irrational health choices
Social epidemiologist Prof Ichiro Kawachi describes how mental short-cuts affect our health choices, often for the worse, and what can be done to help us make better choices.
Up Close: Making nice: Julian Savulescu and the case for moral bioenhancement
Philosopher and bioethicist Julian Savulescu joins host Peter Mares for a conversation on the potential for moral bioenhancement through direct brain stimulation, pharmacology or genetics, and the ethical implications of such interventions.
Up Close: Cannabis research: The state of the science in an age of weed liberalization
Psychiatrist and clinical researcher Prof David Castle discusses how cannabis represents both a public health risk and a wide-ranging therapeutic opportunity, as the once “evil weed” gains greater legal acceptance for recreational and medical use.
Up Close: Decision neuroscience: Emerging insights into the way we choose
Decision science researcher Prof Peter Bossaerts argues that investigating brain activity as we make decisions is generating new insights into how we deal with uncertainty and risk. Once the domain of economists and psychologists, the study of human decision-making is increasingly taking a neuron-level view, with implications well beyond economics and finance.
Online Feature: Is sexual addiction the real deal?
Researchers have measured how the brain behaves in "hypersexual" people who have problems regulating their viewing of sexual images.