Australasian Science: Australia's authority on science since 1938

Articles related to pharmacology

Browse: Immune Response Triggers Side-Effects to Common Drugs
Feature: The Doping Age
A new study finds that doping in sport has spread to Australian athletes as young as 12 years of age.
Browse: Herbal Medicine’s Hidden Risks Pose a Threat to Health Browse: Diabetes Drug Reduces Heart and Kidney Diseases
Browse: IVF Steroid Treatment May Do More Harm than Good Browse: Plant-based Chemicals Could Reverse Terminal Cancer
Browse: Gold Nanoparticles Reduce Side-Effects of Arthritis Drug Browse: Anti-Cancer Drug Helps Malaria
Browse: Back Pain: The Drugs Don’t Work Browse: Paracetamol Overdose Explained
The association between paracetamol overdose and liver failure has been explained, accompanied by prospects for resolving the problem.
Browse: New Painkiller from Fanged Fish’s Heroin-Like Venom Browse: Gel Can End Blushing
As much as a quarter of the population is frightened of blushing, and many of them may avoid situations in which they fear their cheeks will give them away. Prof Peter Drummond of Murdoch University’s Psychology Department thinks that an easily available gel may be the answer.
Browse: The Dangers of Slow-Release Paracetamol
Artwork by Scot Nicholls, Domokun Design, reproduced from Chemistry & Biology
Feature: Protein Scissors that also Learned to Glue
An enzyme found in plants has some remarkable abilities that have drug designers excited.
morgue
Cover Story: Post Mortem: What Happens to Drugs after Death?
Drug levels can rise, fall or even disappear entirely after death, potentially leading to incorrect conclusions about murder, suicide and drug overdoses.
Credit: Maksym Yemelyanov/adobe
Feature: Pharmed Meds
Some clever chemistry is turning plants into pharmaceutical factories that could enable remote communities in developing countries to grow and store stable medicines cheaply.
Credit: iStockphoto/Андрей Юдин
Feature: Drugs and the Death Penalty: Breaking the Supply Chain
Pharmaceutical giant Pfizer has banned the sale of its drugs for use in executions, but this has led some US states to experiment with lethal injection protocols.
Feature: Why Haven’t We Cured Addiction Yet?
Millions of people are struggling with addictions to smoking, drinking and drugs, but the search for new medications to help them quit remains elusive. Here’s why.
Feature: Malaria Drugs Offer New Herbicide Targets
A relic chloroplast in the malaria parasite opens the prospect of developing a new generation of herbicides from anti-malaria drugs.
Browse: Tarantula Venom May Block Chronic Pain
Browse: Stroke Drug Alleviates Alzheimer’s Browse: Jellyfish Venom “Milked”
Browse: Sweet Revenge against Superbugs Browse: 3D Protein Map Offers New Malaria Vaccine Hope
Browse: A Pill to Treat Sugar Addiction Browse: Monotreme Venom’s Potential as a Diabetes Drug
Browse: A Sprinkle of Microbes on Cereal Could Suppress Allergies The Bitter Pill: Seeking the Evidence for Chinese Medicine
By looking for active ingredients in traditional Chinese medicines, ethnopharmacologists are finding evidence for their efficacy.
Quandary: The Dark Background to Immortal Cells
The origins of human cell lines used in some of the world’s greatest medical discoveries have been called into question.
Quandary: Third World Bioethics
Poverty overcomes informed consent in India, where nearly 2900 people died in India during clinical trials of drugs between 2005 and 2012.
Quandary: Married at First Sight
Reality TV has added a fresh perspective to the bioethical debate about the use of love drugs.
Quandary: Last-Minute Complications
Botched executions provide a timely warning that assisted suicide does not necessarily lead to a peaceful death.
Up Close: Making nice: Julian Savulescu and the case for moral bioenhancement
Philosopher and bioethicist Julian Savulescu joins host Peter Mares for a conversation on the potential for moral bioenhancement through direct brain stimulation, pharmacology or genetics, and the ethical implications of such interventions.
Online Feature: The Tamiflu saga shows why all research data should be public
Attempts to evaluate whether the antiviral drug Tamiflu is effective have been stymied by lack of access to the data from clinical trials.
Online Feature: Shroom to grow: Australia's missing psychedelic science
A recent Norwegian study on psychedelic drugs and psychological well-being not only highlighted fewer mental health issues among users of these drugs but also underscored the reinvigoration of scientific research in a field maligned since the moral panic of the 1960s.
Online Feature: This psychoactive drugs trip isn't working
The increasing pace and diversity of recreational drug development makes conventional approaches to drug control dangerous.
Online Feature: Viewing Catalyst's cholesterol programs through the sceptometer
Was the ABC wrong to air a program that might encourage people at risk of heart disease to stop taking cholesterol-reducing medications without consulting their GP?