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Why we're building a climate change game for 12-year-olds

By the age of 16, most teenagers have already made up their mind about climate change.


Originally published in The Conversation.

Not just available, but also useful: we must keep pushing to improve open access to research

There is a huge appetite for science and other research - so why aren't more academic publications truly 'open access'?


Originally published in The Conversation.

Don't use technology as a bargaining chip with your kids

How often do you take away your kid's phone? RoongsaK/Shutterstock

Do you take away your teenager’s phone to manage their behaviour?


Originally published in The Conversation.

South Korea's public broadcasters are in an impossible political position

Compared with their counterparts in other democratic countries, South Korea’s national public broadcasters are politically vulnerable.

Tied to whichever government is in power, they are saddled with a compromised board system and limited options for editorial independence across TV, radio and online content.


Originally published in The Conversation.

In for the long-haul: the challenge to fly non-stop from Australia to anywhere in the world

Australian airline Qantas has the aircraft it needs to fly non-stop from Perth to London, but its goal is to offer even longer flights than that.


Originally published in The Conversation.

Thor: Ragnarok pitches superheroes against science (and how does Hulk keep his pants on?)

Thor: Ragnarok sees Thor do battle with Hulk. Marvel Studios

Thor: Ragnarok is the latest Marvel movie out today that sees Australian Chris Hemsworth back as Thor, but he’s not on friendly ho


Originally published in The Conversation.

5G will be a convenient but expensive alternative to the NBN

Will Australia’s National Broadband Network (NBN) face damaging competition from the upcoming 5G network? NBN Co CEO Bill Morrow thinks so.


Originally published in The Conversation.

Curious Kids: Where did the first person come from?

Here’s a modern human skull on the left, and Neanderthal skull on the right. Darren Curnoe, Author provided

This is an article from Curious Kids, a new series for children.


Originally published in The Conversation.

Turnbull's government must accept responsibility for delivering an equitable NBN for all Australians

NBN delivery is variable across different states, but also within the same local council areas.


Originally published in The Conversation.

Fingerprinting to solve crimes: not as robust as you think

There's a margin of error in relying on fingerprinting to catch criminals.


Originally published in The Conversation.