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Blocking Huawei from Australia means slower and delayed 5G – and for what?

The United States and Australia are deliberately restricting the place of Chinese telco Huawei in their telecommunications landscapes.

We’re told these changes will be worth it from a security point of view.




Read more:
What is a mobile network, anyway? This is 5G, boiled down


Originally published in The Conversation.

Curious Kids: how was the Earth made?

Earth is really ancient, and humans have only been around for a tiny part of that time.


Originally published in The Conversation.

How we solved the mystery of Libyan desert glass

A collection of raw Libyan desert glass. Linnas/Shutterstock

In the remote desert of western Egypt, near the Libyan border, lie clues to an ancient cosmic cataclysm.


Originally published in The Conversation.

The 'pulse' of a volcano can be used to help predict its next eruption

The 2018 eruption of Kilauea volcano was preceded by damage of the magma plumbing system at the summit. Courtesy of Grace Tobin, 60 Minutes, Author provided

Predicting when a volcano will next blow is tricky business, but The Conversation.

Teenagers need our support, not criticism, as they navigate life online

Life online is still life, but with extra challenges.


Originally published in The Conversation.

Curious Kids: why do we sigh?

Take a deep breath.


Originally published in The Conversation.

Some of our foods have nano particles in them – should we be worried?

Nanoparticles occur naturally in some foods, and others have them added.


Originally published in The Conversation.

We made a moving tectonic map of the Game of Thrones landscape

Scientists have pieced together Game of Thrones' geology as the show draws last breath on television. Kal242382 from Wikimedia Commons, CC BY-SA


Originally published in The Conversation.

The way we define kilograms, metres and seconds changes today

A new standard defines the kilogram from today. Shutterstock/Piotr Wytrazek

We measure stuff all the time – how long, how heavy, how hot, and so on – because we need to for things such as trade, health and knowledge.


Originally published in The Conversation.