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How much do our genes restrict free will?

Author provided

Social media algorithms, artificial intelligence, and our own genetics are among the factors influencing us beyond our awareness. This raises an ancient question: do we have control over our own lives?


Originally published in The Conversation.

This mysterious 'exotic stellar peacock' may open the door to a realm of physics only ever glimpsed

ESO/Callingham et al., CC BY-ND

An astronomical discovery is shedding new light on an exquisitely-formed star system in our own Milky Way galaxy, featuring two


Originally published in The Conversation.

Why do some people struggle to make 'healthy' decisions, day after day?

Shutterstock

To navigate our way through the world, we constantly make choices. While we’ve all made our fair share of regrettable ones, most of us eventually learn from these – and we generally take this ability for granted.


Originally published in The Conversation.

Do social media algorithms erode our ability to make decisions freely? The jury is out

Charles Deluvio/Unsplash, CC BY-SA

Social media algorithms, artificial intelligence, and our own genetics are among the factors influencing us beyond our awar


Originally published in The Conversation.

Facebook is removing QAnon pages and groups from its sites, but critical thinking is still the best way to fight conspiracy theories

Facebook has announced a ban on groups and pages identified with the rapidly growing QAnon conspiracy movement, which will cover both Facebook itself and the Facebook-owned Instagram.


Originally published in The Conversation.

What is CRISPR, the gene editing technology that won the Chemistry Nobel prize?

The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences yesterday awarded the 2020 Nobel Prize in Chemistry to Emmanuelle Charpentier and Jennifer Doudna for their work on CRISPR, a method of genome editing.

A genome is the full set of genetic “instructions” that determine how an organism will develop. Using CRISPR, researchers can cut up DNA in an organism’s genome and edit its sequence.


Originally published in The Conversation.

It was growing rainforests, not humans, that killed off Southeast Asia's giant hyenas and other megafauna

Peter Schouten, Author provided

Thinking of Southeast Asia today may conjure up images of dense tropical rainforests teeming with iconic jungle animals such as orangutans, tigers and monkeys.


Originally published in The Conversation.

We might not be able to understand free will with science. Here's why

Gabriel Crismariu/Unsplash, CC BY

Social media algorithms, artificial intelligence, and our own genetics are among the factor


Originally published in The Conversation.

Nearly half a million poultry deaths: there are 3 avian influenza outbreaks in Victoria. Should we be worried?

As we navigate a global human pandemic, avian influenza (or “bird flu”) has been detected in domestic poultry across Victoria.

When scientists discuss avian influenza, we’re usually referring to the diverse subtypes of influenza that primarily infect birds. Avian influenza viruses are commonly found in healthy wild birds and can also cause illness and death among domestic poultry including chickens, turkeys and ducks.


Originally published in The Conversation.