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Brain temperature is difficult to measure. Here's how a new infrared technique can help

Shutterstock/Popartic

Brain temperature is implicated in many common conditions including stroke, multiple sclerosis, epilepsy, traumatic brain injury, and headaches.


Originally published in The Conversation.

Revealed: the protein 'spike' that lets the 2019-nCoV coronavirus pierce and invade human cells

Researchers Jason McLellan (left) and Daniel Wrapp study the structure of the 2019-nCoV coronavirus. Vivian Abagiu/Univ.


Originally published in The Conversation.

I made bushfire maps from satellite data, and found a glaring gap in Australia's preparedness

Image courtesy of Greg Harvie, Author provided

On the night of January 9 2020, my wife and I secured our Kangaroo Island home and anxiously monitored the South Australian Country


Originally published in The Conversation.

Can new Snapchat features help troubled teens?

Shutterstock/The Conversation

Snapchat has announced a new feature called “Here For You” that promises to “provide proactive in-app support to Snapchatters who may be


Originally published in The Conversation.

65,000-year-old plant remains show the earliest Australians spent plenty of time cooking

Researchers May Nango, Djaykuk Djandjomerr and S. Anna Florin collecting plants in Kakadu National Park.


Originally published in The Conversation.

Critical minerals are vital for renewable energy. We must learn to mine them responsibly

As the world shifts away from fossil fuels, we will need to produce enormous numbers of wind turbines, solar panels, electric vehicles and batteries. Demand for the materials needed to build them will skyrocket.


Originally published in The Conversation.

Collective trauma is real, and could hamper Australian communities' bushfire recovery

Most of us are probably familiar with the concept of psychological trauma, the impact on an individual’s psyche caused by an extremely distressing event.

But there’s another kind of trauma. A collective disturbance that occurs within a group of people when their world is suddenly upended.


Originally published in The Conversation.

High-tech shortages loom as coronavirus shutdowns hit manufacturers

There are now more than 45,000 confirmed cases of the coronavirus dubbed COVID-19 by the World Health Organization, and the disease has caused at least 1,115 deaths. The impact of the virus is now reaching way beyond public health: China is at the heart of global manufacturing, and as supply chains suffer, panic is beginning to set in.


Originally published in The Conversation.

Chief Scientist: we need to transform our world into a sustainable 'electric planet'

I want you to imagine a highway exclusively devoted to delivering the world’s energy.

Each lane is restricted to trucks that carry one of the world’s seven large-scale sources of primary energy: coal, oil, natural gas, nuclear, hydro, solar and wind.

Our current energy security comes at a price, the carbon dioxide emissions from the trucks in the three busiest lanes: the ones for coal, oil and natural gas.

We can’t just put up roadblocks overnight to stop these trucks; they are carrying the overwhelming majority of the world’s energy supply.


Originally published in The Conversation.

Small world: atom-scale materials are the next tech frontier

Could graphene - shown here as an illustration of its molecular structure - come to define the next phase of the information revolution? Rost9/Shutterstock

Every age in the history of human civilisation has a signature material, from the Stone Age, to the Bronze and Iron


Originally published in The Conversation.