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Don't fear robo-justice. Algorithms could help more people access legal advice

Should we be afraid of robo-justice? Maksim Kabakou/Shutterstock

You may have heard that algorithms will take over the world. But how are they operating right now?


Originally published in The Conversation.

I’ve always wondered: why do our computing devices seem to slow down?

Your gadgets might slow down if they're bloated with apps. Neirfy/Shutterstock

This is an article from I’ve Always Wondered, a series where readers send in questions


Originally published in The Conversation.

Google’s new Go-playing AI learns fast, and even thrashed its former self

Better than human: the artificial intelligence that learned to master Go in just three days. Shutterstock/maxuser

Just last year Google DeepMind’s AlphaGo took the world of Artificial Intelligence (AI) by storm, showi


Originally published in The Conversation.

Why marking essays by algorithm risks rewarding the writing of 'bullshit'

Will marking algorithms really reward good writing? Terence/Shutterstock

You may have heard that algorithms will take over the world. But how are they operating right now?


Originally published in The Conversation.

When bacteria tell a story: tracing Indigenous Australian ochre sources via microbial 'fingerprinting'

Indigenous Australians use ochre to add colour and detail to items such as this shield at the South Australian Museum.


Originally published in The Conversation.

Your body's cells use and resist force, and they move. It's mechanobiology

We can use mechanobiology to learn how immune cells attack cancer cells.


Originally published in The Conversation.

Mount Agung continues to rumble with warnings the volcano could still erupt

It’s more than three weeks since the alert level on Bali’s Mount Agung was raised to its highest level. An eruption was expected imminently and thousands of people were evacuated, but the volcano has still not erupted.


Originally published in The Conversation.

Was agriculture the greatest blunder in human history?

Rice famers near Siem Reap, Cambodia. Darren Curnoe, Author provided

Twelve thousand years ago everybody lived as hunters and gatherers. But by 5,000 years ago most people lived as farmers.


Originally published in The Conversation.

Ethics by numbers: how to build machine learning that cares

We need to build algorithms that act ethically. BEST-BACKGROUNDS/Shutterstock

You may have heard that algorithms will take over the world. But how are they operating right now?


Originally published in The Conversation.