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Why wearable fitness trackers aren't as useless as some make them out to be

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Wearable fitness trackers will be on many Christmas shopping lists this year, with a vast range of devices (and an ever-increasing number of features) hitting the market just in time for the festive season.


Originally published in The Conversation.

The uninvited Christmas guest: is New Zealand prepared for Omicron's inevitable arrival?

David Hallett/Getty Images

As New Zealand gets ready for the festive season under the new traffic light system, the emergence of the The Conversation.

Mount Semeru's deadly eruption was triggered by rain and storms, making it much harder to predict

The eruption of Mount Semeru in Indonesia on Saturday tragically claimed the lives of 22 people, with another 22 still missing and 56 injured. More than 5,000 people have been affected by the eruption, and more than 2,000 people have taken refuge at 19 evacuation points.


Originally published in The Conversation.

Curious Kids: how did crocodiles survive the asteroid that killed the dinosaurs?

Michael Lee, Author provided

How did the crocodiles survive the asteroid that killed the dinosaurs? – Éamonn, age 5, Western Australia


Originally published in The Conversation.

How the United Nations' new 'open science framework' could speed up the pace of discovery

Mikolaj/Unsplash, CC BY-SA

Science, at its heart, is a collaborative effort.


Originally published in The Conversation.

The Productivity Commission has released proposals to bolster Australians' right to repair. But do they go far enough?

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2021 has been a milestone year for advocacy for a right to repair.


Originally published in The Conversation.

Total solar eclipse will bring 2 minutes of darkness to Antarctica's months of endless daylight

Natacha Pisarenko/AAP Image

The Sun hasn’t set in Antarctica since October. Earth’s southernmost continent is currently experiencing a long summer’s day, one that stretches from mid-October until early April.


Originally published in The Conversation.