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How gibbon skulls could help us understand the social lives of our ancient ancestors

Peng-Fei Fan, Author provided

We have discovered previously unappreciated differences between some male and female gibbons and siamang that could give us new clues about how social behaviour affected primate evolution


Originally published in The Conversation.

Police access to COVID check-in data is an affront to our privacy. We need stronger and more consistent rules in place

The Australian Information Commissioner this week called for a ban on police accessing QR code check-in data, unless for COVID-19 contact tracing purposes.


Originally published in The Conversation.

Facebook or Twitter posts can now be quietly modified by the government under new surveillance laws

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A new law gives Australian police unprecedented powers for online surveillance, data interception and altering data.


Originally published in The Conversation.

From bespoke seats to titanium arms, 3D printing is helping paralympians gain an edge

Major sporting events like the Paralympics are a breeding ground for technological innovation. Athletes, coaches, designers, engineers and sports scientists are constantly looking for the next improvement that will give them the edge. Over the past decade, 3D printing has become a tool to drive improvements in sports like running and cycling, and is increasingly used by paralympic athletes.


Originally published in The Conversation.

NZ is introducing mandatory record keeping to help contact tracers. But is the data protected enough?

Dave Simpson/WireImage

From 11:59pm on Tuesday September 7, every person in Aotearoa New Zealand over the age of 12 will be required to keep a record of their whereabouts, either by scanning QR codes or signing paper registers many businesses and


Originally published in The Conversation.

Flies like yellow, bees like blue: how flower colours cater to the taste of pollinating insects

Hoverfly (_Eristalis tenax_) feeding on marigold Fir0002/Flagstaffotos, CC BY-NC

We all know the birds and the bees are important


Originally published in The Conversation.

Research reveals humans ventured out of Africa repeatedly as early as 400,000 years ago, to visit the rolling grasslands of Arabia

Eleanor Scerri, Author provided

If you stood in the middle of the Nefud Desert in central Arabia today, you’d be confronted on all sides by enormous sand dunes, some rising more than 100 meters from the desert floor.


Originally published in The Conversation.

Is Google getting worse? Increased advertising and algorithm changes may make it harder to find what you're looking for

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Over the past 25 years, the name “Google” has become synonymous with the idea of searching for anything online.


Originally published in The Conversation.

Curious Kids: why is the Sun's atmosphere hotter than its surface?

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Why is the Sun’s atmosphere hotter than its surface? — Olivia, age 9, Canberra


Originally published in The Conversation.