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Cashless payment is booming, thanks to coronavirus. So is financial surveillance

A banknote has been sitting in my wallet for six months now. As time ticks on, it burns an ever greater hole in my pocket.

At first I felt uneasy spending it, following COVID-19 warnings to pay more attention to hand hygiene and the surfaces we all touch on a daily basis.


Originally published in The Conversation.

Curious Kids: what is the Bermuda Triangle and why is it considered dangerous?

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What is the Bermuda Triangle and why is it considered dangerous? Adellaii, age 13, Paterson, NSW


Originally published in The Conversation.

Vegan leather made from mushrooms could mould the future of sustainable fashion

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Seven millennia since its invention, leather remains one of the most durable and versatile natural materials.


Originally published in The Conversation.

Face masks and facial recognition will both be common in the future. How will they co-exist?

Pixabay, CC BY-SA

It’s surprising how quickly public opinion can change.


Originally published in The Conversation.

10 years since the Darfield earthquake rocked New Zealand: what have we learned?

Many of us may remember the magnitude 6.2 earthquake that hit Christchurch, New Zealand, on February 22 2011. The quake caused 185 deaths, thousands of injuries and billions of dollars in damage and economic loss.


Originally published in The Conversation.

Can I still be hacked with 2FA enabled?

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Cybersecurity is like a game of whack-a-mole. As soon as the good guys put a stop to one type of attack, another pops up.


Originally published in The Conversation.

It's not 'fair' and it won't work: an argument against the ACCC forcing Google and Facebook to pay for news

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Google and Facebook have threatened to limit or remove news services for Australian users, in response to the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission’s draft news media bargaining code.


Originally published in The Conversation.

Pain-sensing electronic silicone skin paves the way for smart prosthetics and skin grafts

Ella Maru Studio, Author provided

Skin is our largest organ, made up of complex sensors constantly monitoring for anything that might cause us pain. Our new technology replicates that – electronically.


Originally published in The Conversation.

How do you weigh a dinosaur? There are two ways, and it turns out they're both right

David Evans, Author provided

The most emblematic feature of dinosaurs is their body size.


Originally published in The Conversation.