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Curious Kids: What makes the Earth spin on its axis every day?

In fact, some things are slowing the Earth down or could change its spinning in the future. Shutterstock

This is an article from Curious Kids, a series for children.


Originally published in The Conversation.

The big global space agencies rely on Australia – let's turn that to our advantage

The 35 m-diameter dish antenna of ESA’s deep-space tracking station at New Norcia, Western Australia.


Originally published in The Conversation.

No launch from Australia: something missing from our plans for the new space race

Why no rocket launch plans from Australia? Shutterstock/Gearstd

For the past 20 years, Australia has attempted to stake its claim in the lucrative commercial space industry.


Originally published in The Conversation.

We've designed a 'flux capacitor', but it won't take us Back to the Future

In the Back to the Future movies, the DeLorean car was able to travel through time thanks to a flux capacitor. Wikimedia/Oto Godfrey and Justin Morton

The technology that allowed


Originally published in The Conversation.

Life in a herd – and why in health watching symptoms is easy, but finding causes is hard

shutterstock

With a rollicking story to set the scene, this piece from two science communication experts explores the notion of population health – what is it, and why does it even matter?


Originally published in The Conversation.

Science in film: from the meaning of time to the marvels of fungi

A scene from the short film KCLOC. Screenshot/Vimeo

One of the wonderful things about science is that it makes us think about what we value, or what is meaningful to us.


Originally published in The Conversation.

Revisiting metadata retention in light of the government’s push for new powers

Despite its enormous cost, the metadata retention scheme wasn’t future-proof.


Originally published in The Conversation.

Bees join an elite group of species that understands the concept of zero as a number

Bees live in complex environments, and make lots of decisions every day that are crucial for survival.


Originally published in The Conversation.

Male dolphins use their individual 'names' to build a complex social network

Three allied male dolphins in Shark Bay, Western Australia. Simon J Allen, Author provided

In life it often pays to keep a close eye on competitors and rivals.


Originally published in The Conversation.

Here's what a privacy policy that's easy to understand could look like

We need a simple system for categorising data privacy settings, similar to the way Creative Commons specifies how work can be legally shared. Shutterstock

Data privacy


Originally published in The Conversation.