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How do Labor and the Coalition differ on NBN policy?

As hinted in earlier announcements by Shadow Communications Minister, Jason Clare, Labor’s much-anticipated policy for the National Broadband Network released Monday commits the party – if elected – to move away from the Coalition’s fibre to the node (FTTN) network and transition back to a roll-out of fibre to the premises (FTTP). This was the central pillar of Labor’s original NBN.


Originally published in The Conversation.

Computers may be evolving but are they intelligent?

Computers may be smarter than humans at some things, but are they intelligent? Shutterstock/Olga Nikonova

The final in our Computing turns 60 series, to mark the 60th anniversary of the first computer in an Australian university, looks at h


Originally published in The Conversation.

Ancient asteroid impacts yield evidence for the nature of the early Earth

The early Earth may have been shaped by asteroid bombardment. Shutterstock

The nature of the early Earth’s crust prior to about 4 billion years ago – about half a billion years following formation of the Earth – is shrouded in mystery.


Originally published in The Conversation.

Removing social media hate speech within 24 hours sounds like a good idea, but...

In a bid to fight escalating anti-migrant propaganda, the European Commission this month released a blueprint for regulating online hate, which requires social media companies to take down racist material within 24 hours.

This joint code of conduct sounds like a positive political compromise. But it’s unclear how it will work in practice and how it will benefit the rest of the world’s social media users.


Originally published in The Conversation.

Driverless cars need to hit the road come rain, wind or shine

Humans are still better than machines at driving in extreme weather conditions, for now. Flickr/Terence Lim, CC BY-ND

Would you rather a robot car that can drive you anywhere and


Originally published in The Conversation.

Seven's Olympic coverage could change the way we watch sport on our screens

The Seven Network has announced it will offer a paid subscription service via an app as part of its Rio Olympics coverage this year.

This will make Seven the first free-to-air broadcaster in Australia to charge for broadcasting sport.


Originally published in The Conversation.

The Hobbit took our breath away: now it's the new normal

Homo floresiensis skull from Liang Bua (left) and modern human skull (right). Peter Brown (University of New England).

It’s been a big year for the early human species Homo floresiensis


Originally published in The Conversation.

Computing told us how close we came to a global pandemic of a drug-resistant flu

Computer modelling can help in the fight against the spread of disease. Shutterstock/racorn

The latest in our Computing turns 60 series, to mark the 60th anniversary of the first computer in an Australian university, looks at how close we ca


Originally published in The Conversation.

A 700,000-year-old fossil find shows the Hobbits’ ancestors were even smaller

It was back in October 2004 when archaeologists first unveiled the partial skeleton of a tiny, small-brained hominin previously unknown to science, now known as Homo floresiensis.


Originally published in The Conversation.

How the Hobbits kept their tools as they shrank into island life

The scientific debate continues over the bones of the mysterious human-like creature Homo floresiensis – nicknamed “Hobbits” – with the discovery of new fossils in the So'a Basin on the island of Flores, Indonesia, dating to 700,000 years ago.

But one often-overlooked aspect is that Homo floresiensis used technology —- in this case stone toolkits —- to adapt to the exotic Flores environment.


Originally published in The Conversation.