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Why we're watching the giant Australian cuttlefish

Hello little ones! Juvenile giant Australian cuttlefish developing under rocks in the waters of South Australia. Fred Bavendam, Author provided

Australia is home to the world’s only known site where cuttlefish gather to mate en masse.


Originally published in The Conversation.

The Meg! When the (giant prehistoric) shark bites, the science bites back

Giant sharks are no smiling matter for Jason Statham. Warner Bros. Pictures

The Meg is the blockbuster shark monster movie we didn’t realise we needed in our lives.


Originally published in The Conversation.

Digital homework tools should be more than just the textbook as an app

Is homework any better on a digital device? Shutterstock

Schools are increasingly incorporating digital technologies into their teaching practice, raising questions about whether these technologies actually enhance the learning process.


Originally published in The Conversation.

Facebook is all for community, but what kind of community is it building?

Photo by Andrew Seaman on Unsplash

There are many of us who stand for bringing people together and connecting the world.


Originally published in The Conversation.

Are they watching you? The tiny brains of bees and wasps can recognise faces

How do you look to a bee? A face shown through a "bee eye" camera. A. Dyer and S.


Originally published in The Conversation.

The US plan for a Space Force risks escalating a 'space arms race'

The US wants a 'Space Force' to be the sixth branch of the US military. Shutterstock/Carlos Romero

United States Vice President Mike Pence has confirmed overnight plans to cre


Originally published in The Conversation.

Jupiter's magnetic fields may stop its wind bands from going deep into the gas giant

The colorful cloud belts dominate Jupiter’s southern hemisphere in this image captured by NASA’s Juno spacecraft. NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Kevin M.


Originally published in The Conversation.

Hackers cause most data breaches, but accidents by normal people aren't far behind

Shutterstock

Have you ever had your personal information leaked on the internet?


Originally published in The Conversation.

A disappointing earring, and the world's hottest rock: zirconia

Diamond or zirconia? Apart from the price, it can be hard to tell these two gems apart.


Originally published in The Conversation.