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Computing helps with the complex design of modern architecture

The impressive computer aided design of the atrium at Melbourne's Federation Square. Shutterstock/ChameleonsEye

The latest in our Computing turns 60 series, to mark the


Originally published in The Conversation.

Where could Australia genuinely innovate?

Australia could capitalise on its sun-drenched landscape to innovate in renewable energy. Shutterstock

There is a lot of talk about innovation these days, but are we really innovating in the areas where we could generate the most benefit for Australia and the world?


Originally published in The Conversation.

From dark gravity to phantom energy: what's driving the expansion of the universe?

There are two broad ways to measure the expansion of the universe.


Originally published in The Conversation.

Computing helps the study of infections on a global and local scale

Advances in computing make it possible to model the spread of disease on an individual level, in a population of millions of people. Shutterstock/Maridav

The latest in our Computing turns 60 series, to mark the 60th anniversary of the first c


Originally published in The Conversation.

RIP E.T. – alien life on most exoplanets dies young

Artist's rendition of one of the billions of rocky exoplanets in our galaxy.
Did life once exist on its surface?
NASA/JPL-Caltech

Astronomers have found a plethora of planets around nearby stars.


Originally published in The Conversation.

The story of the nosebleed decline of the newspaper industry told in pictures




US Bureau of Labor Statistics: Employment in the information industries
US Bureau of Labor Statistics

The impact of the Internet on the newspaper industry has been starkly highlighted by a graph The Conversation.

Computing gives an artist new tools to be creative

Creating images with fractals thanks to a computer program. Flickr/cornishdave, CC BY-NC-ND

The latest in our


Originally published in The Conversation.

The trolley dilemma: would you kill one person to save five?

It's out of control and heading for five unsuspecting bystanders! Shutterstock

Imagine you are standing beside some tram tracks. In the distance, you spot a runaway trolley hurtling down the tracks towards five workers who cannot hear it coming.


Originally published in The Conversation.

Kitchen Science: from sizzling brisket to fresh baked bread, the chemical reaction that makes our favourite foods taste so good

The Maillard reaction is what gives brisket it's brown colour and delicious flavours. Shutterstock

Have you ever wondered how freshly baked bread gets its a golden brown crust and why it smells so good? Or how nondescript green berries turn into beautiful brown coffee beans with a rich alluring aroma?


Originally published in The Conversation.

There must be smarter security than a ban on 'dumb' passwords

Believe it or not but '123456' and 'password' are still used by people today as passwords. Flickr/alexljackson, CC BY-NC

In cyberspace we are facing The Conversation.