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Why don't people get it? Seven ways that communicating risk can fail

There's a reason why some people don't want to listen.


Originally published in The Conversation.

Look up! Your guide to some of the best meteor showers for 2017

Patience can be rewarded as with this composite of the 2016 Geminids meteor shower, seen over Mt Teide volcano on the Canary Islands, off Spain Flickr/StarryEarth, CC BY-NC

After a dis


Originally published in The Conversation.

Wait a moment: 2016 goes a little longer thanks to a leap second

That time is it on Earth? National Measurement Institute

To the time-poor of the world: take heart, for 2016 is a generous year.


Originally published in The Conversation.

2016: the year in space and astronomy

The discovery of the year was the first detection of gravitational waves. LIGO/T. Pyle

The achievements of astrophysicists this year were as groundbreaking as they were varied.


Originally published in The Conversation.

Think again before you post online those pics of your kids

The photo of your child may look cute today but how will they feel when they're all grown up? Shutterstock/Michal Staniewski

You might think it’s cute to snap a photo of your toddler running around in a playground or having a temper tantrum, and then posting it on social media.


Originally published in The Conversation.

The year of the #techfail: All of tech gets a prize as reality bites

Samsung Thaivisa.com

2016 has been a watershed year for technology. There has been some spectacular fails that have brought a more realistic perspective to the fundamental belief that technology improves with time.


Originally published in The Conversation.

8 space reasons to look up in 2017

The annular solar eclipse of 4th January 2011 as seen by the Hinode satellite.


Originally published in The Conversation.

Where to start reading philosophy?

Time to sink into some deep thoughts. Shutterstock

Philosophy can seem a daunting subject in which to dabble. But there are many wonderful books on philosophy that tackle big ideas without requiring a PhD to digest.


Originally published in The Conversation.

Would you eat a 3D printed pizza?

Look tasty? It depends what's in it. Natural Machines

Could you imagine serving a 3D printed turkey for Christmas lunch? Or munching on a 3D printed pizza for an afternoon snack?


Originally published in The Conversation.

Use it or lose it: the search for enlightenment in dark data

How to make sense of it all? Shutterstock

Big data is big news these days. But most organisations just end up hoarding vast reams of data, leaving them with a massive repository of unstructured – or “dark” – data that is of little use to anyone.


Originally published in The Conversation.