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Fossil tooth fractures and microscopic detail of enamel offer new clues about human diet and evolution

Author provided, Author provided

Teeth can tell us a lot about the evolution of prehistoric humans, and our latest study of one of our species’ close relati


Originally published in The Conversation.

The science of underwater swimming: how staying submerged gives Olympians the winning edge

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To win swimming gold in Tokyo, swimmers not only have to generate incredible power with their arms and legs to propel themselves through the water; they also have to overcome the relentless pull of the water’s drag while doing so.


Originally published in The Conversation.

The sunlight that powers solar panels also damages them. 'Gallium doping' is providing a solution

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Solar power is already the cheapest form of electricity generation, and its cost will continu


Originally published in The Conversation.

We've discovered an undersea volcano near Christmas Island that looks like the Eye of Sauron

Phil Vandenbossche & Nelson Kuna/CSIRO, Author provided

Looking like the Eye of Sauron from the Lord of the Rings Trilogy, an a


Originally published in The Conversation.

How does the Pegasus spyware work, and is my phone at risk?

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A major journalistic investigation has found evidence of malicious software being used by governments around the world, including all


Originally published in The Conversation.

A new image shows jets of plasma shooting out of a supermassive black hole

Event Horizon Telescope project/Nature Astronomy

In 2019, when astronomers captured the first image of a black hole’s shadow — a bright orange doughnut-shaped halo created by


Originally published in The Conversation.

The world might run out of a crucial ingredient of touch screens. But don't worry, we've invented an alternative

Timothy Muza/Unsplash, CC BY-SA

Have you ever imagined your smart phone or tablet without a touch screen?


Originally published in The Conversation.

In the evolutionary arms race between cane toads and lungworms, skin secretions play a surprising role

Martin Mayer, Author provided

Unlike many other species of amphibians, the cane toad is thriving.


Originally published in The Conversation.

I've always wondered: why are the stars, planets and moons round, when comets and asteroids aren't?

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I’m puzzled as to why the planets, stars and moons are all round (when) other large and small objects such as asteroids and meteorites are irregular shapes?


Originally published in The Conversation.

The 'martyrdom effect': why your pain boosts a charity’s gain

This weekend, participants in the Kokoda Challenge will complete a gruelling 96-kilometre overnight trek to raise money for youth programs.


Originally published in The Conversation.