Australasian Science: Australia's authority on science since 1938

Online Feature

Digital inclusion in Tasmania has improved in line with NBN rollout – will the other states follow?

Rollout of the NBN in Tasmania is well ahead of other states and territories in Australia.


Originally published in The Conversation.

Curious Kids: Where are all the other galaxies hidden?

The other galaxies are there, but they are hiding a very long way away. www.shutterstock.com

This is an article from Curious Kids,


Originally published in The Conversation.

Australia needs boldness and bravery from Karen Andrews, the new minister for industry, science and technology

It’s almost a year since Australia had a named science minister in Cabinet.

Now the role has been revived, following a weekend ministerial reshuffle after Scott Morrison became the new Australian prime minister.


Originally published in The Conversation.

Would an eruption in Melbourne really match Hawaii's volcanoes? Here's the evidence

Spectacular images of recent volcanic eruptions in Hawaii are a little disheartening – especially given news reports suggesting there is a sleeping volcano under Melbourne that could awaken and erupt at any moment.

Understanding the geological differences between Melbourne and Hawaii is really helpful in working out how we can keep an eye on future risks in Australia.


Originally published in The Conversation.

Australian archaeologists dropped the term 'Stone Age' decades ago, and so should you

The use of stone tools is evidence of technnological sophistication. Shutterstock/iurii

“Stone Age” is a term often used to refer to early periods in human cultural evolution, when deliberately manufactured sharp stone flakes were the main cutting tool.


Originally published in The Conversation.

Curious Kids: Do butterflies remember being caterpillars?

Inside the pupa (or chrysalis), the caterpillar actually turns to liquid as it transforms into a butterfly or moth. Shutterstock

This is an article from Curious Kids, a series for children.


Originally published in The Conversation.

Holding big tech companies to account: do their employees have the power?

When the workforce recolts. Sshutterstock/Alexandr III

When it comes to the tech giant Google, secret plans to launch a new search service in China prompted a furious reaction from more than 1,400 of the company’s employees.


Originally published in The Conversation.

More than just a sparkling gem: what you didn't know about diamonds

My favourite gem is an occasional series in which we ask a scientist to share the fascinating geological and social features of a beautiful rock.


They’re made of carbon – but there’s something almost supernatural about diamonds.

Just the word diamond invokes luxury, desirability and toughness. Yet when we think of the element carbon we are more likely to think of charcoal; soft, black, opaque, earthy, light-weight.


Originally published in The Conversation.

If it ain't broke, don't fix it: Australia should stay away from electronic voting

Russia was behind an enormous effort to influence politics in the US and the UK, but was Australia targeted too? In this series, Hacking #auspol, we explore how covert foreign influence operates in Australia, and what we can do about it.


Originally published in The Conversation.

Ancient teenager the first known person with parents of two different species

We don't have the full skeleton of a Denisovan so we don't really know what they looked like.


Originally published in The Conversation.