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AI scans your data to assess your character but Biometric Mirror asks: what if it is wrong?

Biometric Mirror is an interactive application that takes your photo and analyses it to identify your demographic and personality characteristics. Shutterstock

In 20


Originally published in The Conversation.

Curious Kids: Why do volcanoes erupt?

Some explosive volcanoes can send ash high up into the sky and it can travel around the world over different countries. Shutterstock

This is an article from Curious Kids, a series for children.


Originally published in The Conversation.

Capturing the shadow of Saturn's moon Titan from right here on Earth

NASA's Cassini spacecraft captures Saturn's largest moon, Titan, passes in front of the planet and its rings. NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute

Titan


Originally published in The Conversation.

Battle scars reveal the life of 'Mephisto', a WW1 German tank from a century ago

Mephisto after its capture in France by the Australian 26th Battalion. Queensland Museum, Author provided

What can we possibly learn from the archaeological study of a World War I battle tank?


Originally published in The Conversation.

Technology doesn't have to be lonely: encouraging dialogue over diatribe

Almost four in 10 millennials spend more time on their smartphones than they do engaging with people in real life. Mavis Wong/The Conversation, CC BY-SA

Do you ever feel like when you post to Facebook, you’re publishing int


Originally published in The Conversation.

The winners and losers in the 2018 World Cup broadcast battle

France might have won the 2018 World Cup title, but who were the real winners in the broadcast battle? Not everyone could make it to Russia to watch the games live, and that left people all over the world relying on the distribution and associated media rights within their region.

In Australia there was a lot of debate and discussion around the media rights for the World Cup and associated technical issues. The rights were held by Optus, a major telecommunications company, not a traditional television broadcaster.


Originally published in The Conversation.

The origins of those sexual organs: a fishy tale much more primitive than we thought

_Euphanerops_, a primitive jawless fish from the World Heritage site at Miguasha, Quebec, which has now been found to have paired hind limb structures and copulatory sex organs. François Miville-Deschênes with permission, Author provided

Fossil discoveries from the


Originally published in The Conversation.

US citizens can now publish models of 3D printed firearms online. What does it mean for us?

The lawyer for the plaintiff successfully argued that sharing a 3D scan of a firearm on the internet was protected on free speech grounds. Shutterstock

A landmark case in


Originally published in The Conversation.

Curious Kids: If an insect is flying in a car while it is moving, does the insect have to move at the same speed?

Once the car is at steady speed, the insect doesn’t need to be pulled along anymore and it won't be able to tell that the car is moving. Shutterstock

This is an article from Curious Kids, a series for children.


Originally published in The Conversation.

Red sky at night, shepherd's delight: the science of beautiful sunsets

If you live in a place where the weather moves west to east, then an old proverb could help you predict the weather. The Conversation.