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Phone wet and won't turn on? Here's how to deal with water damage (hint: soaking it in rice won't work)

Shutterstock

If you’ve ever gotten your phone wet in the rain, dropped it in water or spilt liquid over it, you’re not alone.


Originally published in The Conversation.

From fireballs in the sky to a shark in the stars: the astronomical artistry of Segar Passi

Elsie Passi, Author provided

When Uncle Segar Passi watches the position of the setting Sun from his front patio, he notes its location and relates that to the time of year and changes in seasonal cycles.


Originally published in The Conversation.

'Potential for harm': Microsoft to make US$22 billion worth of augmented reality headsets for US Army

Microsoft

Microsoft has reportedly been awarded a ten year contract worth close to US$22 billion, to provide 120,000 military-grade a


Originally published in The Conversation.

A quarantine-free trans-Tasman bubble opens on April 19, but 'flyer beware' remains the reality of pandemic travel

Shutterstock/Pavel Ignatov

New Zealand’s government today announced a long-awaited quarantine-free travel bubble between Ne


Originally published in The Conversation.

Snooze blues? How using your favourite song as an alarm can help you wake up more alert

Author provided

This morning after awakening when the alarm went off, you may have experienced a feeling of grogginess and lack of alertness. This is a physiological phenomenon termed “sleep inertia”. If you experience this, you are not alone.


Originally published in The Conversation.

Curious Kids: why do people like to kiss? Do other animals kiss?

Shutterstock

Why do people like to kiss? Do other animals kiss? Why are kisses so gross? — Gracie, age 5.


Originally published in The Conversation.

Meet the Egyptian spiny mouse: this menstruating rodent may help us understand human pregnancy

Shutterstock

About 8–12% of couples of reproductive age suffer from infertility, and roughly 15% of all pregnancies end in The Conversation.

An Australian 'space command' could be a force for good — or a cause for war

iss e orig NASA

As the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) celebrated 100 years with a spectacular and well-attended flyover in Canberra yesterday, many eyes were lifted to the skies. But RAAF’s ambitions go even higher, as its motto “through adversity, to the stars” hints.


Originally published in The Conversation.