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Curious Kids: how did crocodiles survive the asteroid that killed the dinosaurs?

Michael Lee, Author provided

How did the crocodiles survive the asteroid that killed the dinosaurs? – Éamonn, age 5, Western Australia


Originally published in The Conversation.

How the United Nations' new 'open science framework' could speed up the pace of discovery

Mikolaj/Unsplash, CC BY-SA

Science, at its heart, is a collaborative effort.


Originally published in The Conversation.

The Productivity Commission has released proposals to bolster Australians' right to repair. But do they go far enough?

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2021 has been a milestone year for advocacy for a right to repair.


Originally published in The Conversation.

Total solar eclipse will bring 2 minutes of darkness to Antarctica's months of endless daylight

Natacha Pisarenko/AAP Image

The Sun hasn’t set in Antarctica since October. Earth’s southernmost continent is currently experiencing a long summer’s day, one that stretches from mid-October until early April.


Originally published in The Conversation.

Mathematical discoveries take intuition and creativity – and now a little help from AI

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Research in mathematics is a deeply imaginative and intuitive process. This might come as a surprise for those who are still recovering from high-school algebra.


Originally published in The Conversation.

500,000 or 20,000? How to estimate the size of a political rally properly

Mining magnate Clive Palmer created controversy last week when he claimed on ABC Radio that 500,000 people had attended the COVID “freedom” protest in Melbourne on Saturday November 20. Maverick MP Craig Kelly opted for the marginally more modest “tens of thousands of people as far as the eye could see”.


Originally published in The Conversation.

What's the secret to making sure AI doesn't steal your job? Work with it, not against it

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Whether it’s athletes on a sporting field or celebrities in the jungle, nothing holds our attention like the drama of vying for a single prize.


Originally published in The Conversation.

Up to half of Earth's water may come from solar wind and space dust

Curtin University

Water is vital for life on Earth, and some experts say we should all drink around two litres every day as part


Originally published in The Conversation.

The government's planned 'anti-troll' laws won't help most victims of online trolling

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Yesterday, Prime Minister Scott Morrison and Attorney-General Michaelia Cash announced


Originally published in The Conversation.