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Is there evidence aliens have visited Earth? Here's what's come out of US congress hearings on 'unidentified aerial phenomena'

JIM LO SCALZO/EPA

The United States Congress recently held a hearing into US government information pertaining to “unidentified aerial phenomena” (UAP


Originally published in The Conversation.

What's it like to be on Venus or Pluto? We studied their sand dunes and found some clues

Sand blown by wind into ripples within Victoria Crater at Meridiani Planum on Mars, as photographed by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter on October 3, 2006. NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona/Cornell/Ohio State University


Originally published in The Conversation.

Climate change is killing trees in Queensland's tropical rainforests

Alexander Schenkin, Author provided

In recent years, the Great Barrier Reef off Australia’s northeast coast has seen multiple events of mass coral bleaching as human-caused global warming has driven sustained high temp


Originally published in The Conversation.

Wrong, Elon Musk: the big problem with free speech on platforms isn't censorship. It's the algorithms

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Imagine there is a public speaking square in your city, much like the ancient Greek agora. Here you can freely share your ideas without censorship.


Originally published in The Conversation.

A fossil tooth places enigmatic ancient humans in Southeast Asia

Fabrice Demeter (University of Copenhagen / CNRS Paris), Author provided

What do a finger bone and some teeth found in the frigid Denisova Cave in Siberia’s Altai mountains have in common with fossils from the balmy h


Originally published in The Conversation.

Digital inequality: why can I enter your building – but your website shows me the door?

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When people hear the term “accessibility” in the context of disability, most will see images of ramps, automatic doors, elevators, or tactile paving (textured ground which helps vision impaired people navigate public spaces).


Originally published in The Conversation.

Humans have big plans for mining in space – but there are many things holding us back

Shutterstock

Like Earth, planetary bodies such as the Moon, Mars, asteroids and comets contain substantial deposits of valuable resources.


Originally published in The Conversation.

Baby oysters follow the crackling sound of snapping shrimp

Oksana Maksymova/Shutterstock

Though oysters may be brainless bivalves, they can “hear” and swim towards attractive sounds of the sea.


Originally published in The Conversation.

Tug of war between survival and reproductive fitness: how chameleons become brighter without predators around

Martin Whiting, Author provided

Invasive species offer a rare research opportunity, as they often colonise new environments very different to their native habitat.


Originally published in The Conversation.