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Feature article

Predator in a Penguin Suit

Little penguins

The aim of the study was to find out if group or solitary hunting strategies were influenced by prey type, and how this affected how much prey an individual caught and how many calories an individual gained.

By Grace Sutton

Miniature video cameras and GPS have given an underwater bird’s-eye view of the hunting behaviours of the world’s smallest penguin.

The full text of this article can be purchased from Informit.

All Creatures Great and Small

Photo: Si-Chong Chen

While it’s true that large animals feed on some large seeds from fleshy fruits, we shouldn’t overlook the fact that large animals, especially ungulates such as rhinoceros, zebras, peccaries, deer and buffalos, also unintentionally vacuum up huge amounts of small, inconspicuous seeds as they browse on short grassy vegetation. These interactions are the primary factor that drives the negative relationship between animal body mass and ingested seed size across all vertebrates. Photo: Si-Chong Chen

By Si-Chong Chen & Angela Moles

Many large animals are rare or under threat, so the discovery that they ingest and disperse both large and small seeds has widespread ecological consequences.

The full text of this article can be purchased from Informit.

Why Don’t Some Dwarves Get Cancer?

The dwarves of a village in Ecuador never succumb to cancer or diabetes.

We now know why the dwarves of a village in Ecuador never succumb to cancer or diabetes.

By Michael Waters & Andrew Brooks

Understanding the molecular mechanism that prevents dwarves from getting cancer and diabetes could lead to treatments for a range of diseases, and even hormone-free aquaculture.

The full text of this article can be purchased from Informit.

The Elusive Northern Hairy-Nosed Wombat

By the 1980s there were as few as 40 individual northern hairy-nosed wombats.

By the 1980s there were as few as 40 individual northern hairy-nosed wombats. Credit: Alan Horsup

By Lauren White & Jeremy Austin

Creative sampling and DNA techniques have allowed scientists to keep track of one of Australia’s most endangered and elusive marsupials.

The full text of this article can be purchased from Informit.

The Immediate Risks of Gas Production to Water Resources

Credit: Mantis Design/Adobe

Credit: Mantis Design/Adobe

By Margaret Shanafield & Craig Simmons

Public concerns about unconventional gas production focus on contamination of aquifers deep below the surface, yet the most immediate risk to water resources is right before our eyes.

The full text of this article can be purchased from Informit.

What’s Jumped Into Your DNA?

Credit: k_e_n/Adobe

Credit: k_e_n/Adobe

By Atma Ivancevic

DNA elements that can transfer between species make up an astonishing 17% of the human genome, and have been associated with schizophrenia and cancer.

The full text of this article can be purchased from Informit.

Why Do Whale Sharks Get So Big?

Credit: Mark Meekan

Credit: Mark Meekan

By Mark Meekan

Whale sharks have evolved to become the world’s largest fish as a consequence of feeding on vast amounts of tiny prey in the cold ocean depths.

The full text of this article can be purchased from Informit.

Welcome to the Anthropocene

Credit: Mopic

Credit: Mopic

By Will Steffen

Say goodbye to the Holocene. Later this year a new epoch might be formally recognised.

The full text of this article can be purchased from Informit.

Top Dog: How Dingoes Save Native Animals

Credit: Bobby Tamayo

During droughts, dingoes limit the abundance of the red fox and feral cat. Credit: Bobby Tamayo

By Aaron Greenville

Dingoes are considered a pest by land managers in Central Australia, but it turns out they are effective pest managers of feral cats and foxes – until the rains come.

The full text of this article can be purchased from Informit.

Giants of Astronomy

An artist’s impression of the Giant Magellan Telescope. Image: GMTO

An artist’s impression of the Giant Magellan Telescope. Image: GMTO

By Helen Sim

“The Hubble” is winding down, but several large land-based and one space-based telescope are poised to be its successors.

The full text of this article can be purchased from Informit.