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Feature article

Climate Records Reveal North–South Divide

climate

It’s little wonder that the two regions have different climate histories: the Southern Hemisphere is a vast oceanic region that is influenced by ocean circulation features such as El Niño, while the Northern Hemisphere is dominated by most of the Earth’s continental masses.

By Joëlle Gergis

The first comprehensive reconstruction of the Southern Hemisphere’s temperature over the past millennium reveals that Northern Hemisphere warm and cool periods were not global. But what about late 20th century warming?

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A Solid Grip on the Moa Extinction

moa

A bird bone to reckon with: Dr Morten Allentoft contemplates the shin bone of a giant female moa.

By Richard Holdaway

Were humans responsible for the extinction of New Zealand’s moa, or were they already in decline?

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Reaching Australia’s Ancient Refugia

painted rock shelters

Australia’s first peoples have painted rock shelters like these for at least 35,000 years, though this activity was discontinued during the stresses of the LGM. Photo: P.S.C. Taçon with permission of Ronald Lamilami and the Aboriginal people of the Namunidjbuk Estate, Wellington Range, Arnhem Land.

By Michelle Langley

New research reveals how Australia’s ancient Aboriginal populations were challenged by extreme climate change between 23,000 and 12,000 years ago, and provides insights into how people may respond to dramatic climate change in the future.

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The Wide Net of Seafood Slavery

A crew of Cambodian boys and men work on a Thai fishing ship a couple hundred miles off the coast of Thailand in the South China Sea. Credit: Ian Urbina / New York Times

A crew of Cambodian boys and men work on a Thai fishing ship a couple hundred miles off the coast of Thailand in the South China Sea. Credit: Ian Urbina / New York Times

By David Tickler & Jessica Meeuwig

Labour abuses are allowing fishing fleets to remain profitable while depleting fisheries ever-further from the coast.

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The Importance of Meal Times on Weight Loss

Credit: showcake/Adobe

Credit: showcake/Adobe

By Amanda Page

Our modern 24/7 appetite is disrupting natural gastric signalling oscillations to the brain. Restricting meal times could help weight loss and maintenance, particularly among shiftworkers.

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The Ancestor of All Flowers

Credit: TKphotography64

Credit: TKphotography64

By Charles Foster

An international collaborative project has reconstructed the ancestor of all modern flowering plants. What can it tell us about the evolution of this important group?

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Quantum Satellite Micius Challenges Einstein

Quantum Satellite Micius Challenges Einstein

By Paul Edwards

Quantum cryptography experiments onboard a new Chinese Earth satellite foreshadow secret communications on a global scale with security guaranteed by the laws of physics.

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Reproductive Threats to Australia’s Marsupials

davemhuntphoto/Adobe

Credit: davemhuntphoto/Adobe

By Andrew Pask

Chemicals used in agriculture, industry and household goods can have effects on marsupial fertility as profound as sex reversal.

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Our Evolutionary Origins Expose Cancer’s Weakness

Credit: kapley/iStockphoto

Credit: kapley/iStockphoto

By Charley Lineweaver

The evolution of cellular regulation has inspired a new model of cancer that predicts ways to attack its weaknesses instead of its strengths.

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The Amazing Bubble

The Amazing Bubble

By Franz Grieser

Bubbles may seem fleeting and fragile but scientists are getting closer to finding the right conditions to turn them into tiny fusion reactors and to recreate the genesis of life itself.

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