Australasian Science: Australia's authority on science since 1938

Cover Story

Cover Story

Small Fry

Zakharova_Natalia  / iStockphoto

Zakharova_Natalia / iStockphoto

By Anna Kuparinen, Asta Audzijonyte & Elizabeth Fulton

Fish are becoming smaller all over the world as oceans change and catches increase, with even small changes having great consequences for ecosystems and fisheries.

Anna Kuparinen is with the University of Helsinki, and Asta Audzijonyte and Elizabeth Fulton are with CSIRO’s Wealth from Oceans Flagship.

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Sex: Why Does It Have To Be So Complicated?

ltsimage/iStockphoto

ltsimage/iStockphoto

By Rob Brooks, Guest Editor

Sex. Three simple letters and a world of complication. How can something so simple, so natural and so very important be so bewilderingly complicated?

Professor Rob Brooks is Director of the Evolution & Ecology Research Centre at the University of New South Wales, and the author of Sex, Genes & Rock 'n' Roll: How Evolution Has Shaped the Modern World (NewSouth). He is Guest Editor of this edition of Australasian Science.

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Hobbit Saga Highlights a Science in Crisis

Painting by Peter Schouten supplied by the University of Wollongong

Homo floresiensis painting by Peter Schouten supplied by the University of Wollongong

By Darren Curnoe

The latest salvo in the ongoing Homo floresiensis battle has placed the science of human evolution in deep conceptual crisis.

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Genomic Testing as a Lifetime Health Resource?

Credit: mrallen/adobe

Credit: mrallen/adobe

By Ainsley Newson & David Amor

If lives could be saved by being “forewarned” by a genomic test, should we perform genomic testing of all babies at birth?

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Fertility in the 21st Century

Credit: Clicknique/iStockphoto

Credit: Clicknique/iStockphoto

By Rebecca Robker & Eileen McLaughlin

Fertility is a diverse field of research that encompasses male and female infertility, pregnancy complications, and environmental and lifestyle influences that can affect the reproductive health not only of future generations but also our native wildlife.

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Survival of the Sexiest

iordani/Adobe

Credit: iordani/Adobe

By Barnaby Dixson & Monica Awasthy

“Survival of the fittest” never applied to beards, so why did they evolve and what role do they play in mate selection in modern society?

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Rock around the Cosmic Clock

Credit: NASA/JPL

Credit: NASA/JPL

By Paul Brook

Astronomers examine pulsar emissions for signs of gravitational waves, but now they believe that an asteroid may have affected the accuracy of one of these “cosmic clocks”.

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Genes that Cuddle in the Cold

Genes that Cuddle in the Cold

By Joshua Mylne

An ingenious experiment has allowed scientists to observe how plant genes move around the nucleus to locations that either stop or stimulate flowering depending on temperature.

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Food Facts & Furphies

Food

More than 50% of Australians are taking some form of vitamins, minerals, complementary or herbal supplements yet the average Australian household spends just $13.70 per week on vegetables and $9.60 on fresh fruit.

By Clare Collins

New diet fads and furphies seem to appear every day. While some of these have a scientific basis, for others the science has changed in response to new discoveries or the science is just not there yet. This special issue of Australasian Science explores the latest evidence for food and nutrition.

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Lies, Damn Lies, and Science

9/11

When a component of the numerous 9/11 theories became untenable, it was nevertheless weaved into a larger 9/11 conspiracy. Credit: flickr/ 9/11 photos (CC by 2.0)

By Stephan Lewandowsky, Gilles Gignac & Klaus Oberauer

Conspiratorial thinking is a major element in the rejection of a broad range of scientific findings, from climate change to tobacco, vaccinations, GM foods and the moon landing. But why?

Stephan Lewandowsky is a Winthrop Professor at the University of Western Australia. Gilles Gignac earned his PhD at Swinburne University, and now specialises in statistics and psychometrics. Klaus Oberauer is Professor of Cognitive Psychology at the University of Zurich.

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