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The Ethics of Modelling Costs

By Eric Crampton

Methodological tricks can deliver headline-grabbing numbers for a good cause, but at the risk of subverting public policy and compromising professional integrity.

A Senior Lecturer in the Department of Economics at the University of Canterbury, Dr Eric Crampton blogs at http://offsettingbehaviour.blogspot.com.au/

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A Critical Juncture for Intellectual Property

By Christoph Antons

Efforts to establish a global IP authority have provoked debate over where intellectual property becomes theft and piracy becomes community action.

Professor Antons is a Chief Investigator with the ARC Centre of Excellence for Creative Industries and Innovation at Deakin University’s School of Law.

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Are We Ready for the Next Drought?

By Craig Simmons

After two La Niña summers, our level of concern about water security is inversely proportional to the water levels in our dams.

Professor Craig Simmons is Director of the National Centre for Groundwater Research and Training at Flinders University.

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Global Outlook for Nuclear Energy

By Michael Angwin

Despite the Fukushima disaster, Australian uranium miners are confident that the growing demand for electricity in a carbon-constrained world will drive an increase in nuclear power generation.

Michael Angwin is CEO of the Australian Uranium Association.

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Rise Up, Citizen Scientists

Climate change protest

Scientists must play an active part in informing and shaping the debate and in developing technology options. Credit: iStockphoto

By Peter J. Cook

What passes for debate over technological priorities to decarbonise energy production needs to be better informed – and scientists need to lead the discussion.

Professor Peter Cook was the Chief Executive of CO2CRC until August 2011. His book Clean Energy, Climate and Carbon was recently published by CSIRO Press.

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Lessons from Space Camp

By Jackie Slaviero

Fascination with space travel can launch primary students into a life of maths and science discovery.

Jackie Slaviero is Assistant Principal at Sydney’s Eastwood Public School and a councillor of the NSW Science Teachers’ Association. She and her pupils are currently raising funds to visit Space Camp later this year.

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Shifting the Watermarks

By Tim Stubbs

The draft Murray-Darling Basin Plan is confused at best and deceptive at worst.

The latest draft Murray-Darling Basin Plan is part of a reform process that will cost taxpayers an estimated $8.9 billion to establish environmentally sustainable levels of take (ESLT) for the rivers of the Basin.

Science Is Sinking in the Murray–Darling Basin

By Tom Chesson

Applied research suffers cuts while science loses farmers’ trust.

Recommendation 14 is one of the most important yet largely ignored recommendations from the Windsor Parliamentary Inquiry into the Murray–Darling Basin water reforms: “that the Commonwealth Government focus greater investment into research and development to improve irrigation efficiency”.

If we do not substantially increase funding for agriculture research, development and extension services the nation’s food security will be severely compromised. We cannot keep doing more with less.

Cargo Cult Communication

By Roger Beckmann

Science communication necessarily focuses on outcomes, but what about the process?

It’s 2012, and it’s respectable to be a science communicator! Those of us who want to promulgate science don’t seem odd anymore. But while welcoming our escape from the closet, we need to be mindful of a pitfall.

Carbon and Forests: The Big Picture

By Jerry Vanclay

Energy generated by burning forestry waste and other biomass sources should be recognised as renewable.

As Australia prepares to pay for its carbon emissions, the challenge is to ensure wise behavioural change rather than “game-playing”. There is a danger that advocates for forests will over-emphasise their capacity for carbon farming, to the detriment of the overall carbon balance.

The two major pools of carbon – in the biosphere and the geosphere – have very different characteristics in terms of cycle time, natural ebb and flow, and reversibility.