Australasian Science: Australia's authority on science since 1938

The Bitter Pill

How Charles Darwin Was Cured by Water

By John Hayman

The “water cure” relieved Charles Darwin of periods of nausea, but why didn’t it work at home?

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Darwin’s Diagnoses

By John Hayman

The father of modern biology suffered much at the hands of alternative medical practitioners.

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The Natural Logic of Health Care

By Wendy Daniels

It’s time to debunk the “natural is healthy and good and non-natural is unhealthy and bad” myth.

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Call Out the Quacks

By Tory Shepherd

Scientists often complain about the way the media treat their message, but journalists have reason to complain as well, since many scientists don’t help to get that message straight.

Tory Shepherd is the Political Editor of The Advertiser and a columnist at The Punch. She regularly writes columns exposing alternative medicine bunkum and bogus health claims.

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Too Open to Ideas?

By Matthew Browne

Why do intelligent people believe incredible things? Psychological studies suggest that the answer may lie in personality type rather than any measure of intelligence.

Dr Matthew Browne is a Lecturer in Psychology at CQUniversity and a biostatistician at the Institute for Health and Social Science Research.

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Is Complementary Medicine a Valid Alternative?

By Marcello Costa

How can we compare the evidence base behind conventional and complementary medicine?

Marcello Costa is Matthew Flinders Distinguished Professor and Professor of Neurophysiology at Flinders University.

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When “Healing Hands” Start Grasping

By John Dwyer

Esoteric breast massage claims “to heal many issues such as painful periods, polycystic ovaries, endometriosis, bloating/water retention, and pre-menstrual and menopausal symptoms”.

John Dwyer is an Emeritus Professor of Medicine at UNSW and Foundation President of Friends of Science in Medicine (www.scienceinmedicine.org.au).

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What’s the Evidence?

By Sue Ieraci

The terms “evidence-based” and “peer-reviewed” have become touchstones for reliability, but why should the views of peers count so much and what does “evidence-based” medicine really mean?

Sue Ieraci is an emergency physician who has worked in NSW public hospitals for 30 years. While maintaining a continuous clinical career, she has held roles in management and medical regulation, and been involved in health systems research.

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Science Advocacy and Social Media

By Campbell Phillips

The ever-changing media landscape is continuing to affect the role of science communication. How can scientists and medical practitioners be expected to respond to social media?

In the world of Web 2.0, where information is shared, diluted, convoluted and conflated just as easily as it is published, how can the layperson expect to divine fact from fantasy?

The past year has seen radical changes in the media landscape, and particularly in science communication, where credibility and accuracy of reportage have been called into question in several instances. These events threaten the exposure of scientific knowledge in the wider community, as people turn to the internet in ever greater numbers for information.

Cap, Gown and Wand

By Michael Vagg

Are there any good arguments for teaching complementary medicines in tertiary institutions?

Dr Michael Vagg is a Consultant Physician in Pain and Rehabilitation Medicine and a Clinical Senior Lecturer at Deakin University. His Twitter handle is @mickvagg.

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