Australasian Science: Australia's authority on science since 1938

Molecular gaze: How discoveries in the life sciences are changing our identities and politics

By Lynne Haultain

Prof. Nikolas Rose explores how scientific developments have changed conceptions of human identity and governance, and what this means for our political, socio-economic and legal futures.

The full text of this article can be purchased from Informit.

LYNNE HAULTAIN

Hi, I'm Lynne Haultain and welcome to Up Close. Nikolas Rose is Professor of Sociology and Head of the Department of Social Science Health and Medicine at Kings College London. Professor Rose explores how scientific developments have changed conceptions of human identity and governance and what this means for our political, socioeconomic and legal futures. Ever since the advent of human science, since the first anatomists and medics started exploring the nature of our human physicality that growing knowledge has had a fascinating and dynamic interrelation with how we think of ourselves, the quality of our humanity and the nature of our societies. The more we know about bodily systems and molecules the more it colours our view of our place in the world and the more complex and fundamental that link becomes.

Nikolas Rose says that the most far reaching ethical innovations are now being made through medical and biomedical thought and not by moral philosophers and ethicists. Professor Rose is visiting Melbourne as a guest of the Australian Sociological Association in partnership with the School of Social and Political Sciences at the University of Melbourne and Victoria...

The full text of this article can be purchased from Informit.