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Loch Ness Waters Sampled for Monster's DNA

The full text of this article can be purchased from Informit.

The story of the Loch Ness monster is one of the world’s greatest mysteries. We have waited more than a thousand years for an answer on its existence. Now, it is only months away.

A global team of scientists, led by Professor Neil Gemmell of the University of Otago, New Zealand, is set to investigate the murky waters of Loch Ness in June 2018.

The team will use environmental DNA (eDNA) sampling of the waters to identify tiny DNA remnants left behind by life in the loch.

They will then establish a detailed list of all life living in Loch Ness and make comparisons between it and several other lochs to find how Loch Ness differs from other sites – if indeed it does.

If there is any evidence of DNA sequences similar to those predicted to come from a large extinct marine reptile, the so called “Jurassic hypothesis”, Professor Gemmell says he will be surprised, but he is open minded about what they might find.

“Large fish like catfish and sturgeons, have been suggested as possible explanations for the monster myth, and we can very much test that idea and others,” he says.

The project, however, is much more than a monster hunt.

“While the prospect of looking for evidence of the Loch Ness monster is the hook to this project, there is an extraordinary amount of new knowledge that we will gain from the work about organisms that inhabit...

The full text of this article can be purchased from Informit.