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Will Enhanced Soldiers Fight a Just War?

Revision Military’s prototype TALOS suit has a powered lower-body exoskeleton supporting a body armour system that can protect 60% of the body from rifle rounds. To relieve weight, motorised actuators pick up each leg and move them. The weight of the helmet, armour and vest is supported by a rigid articulated spine. The suit’s power pack has a cooling fan, and a cooling vest pumps water through 3 metres of tubing under the suit. Credit: Revision Military

Revision Military’s prototype TALOS suit has a powered lower-body exoskeleton supporting a body armour system that can protect 60% of the body from rifle rounds. To relieve weight, motorised actuators pick up each leg and move them. The weight of the helmet, armour and vest is supported by a rigid articulated spine. The suit’s power pack has a cooling fan, and a cooling vest pumps water through 3 metres of tubing under the suit. Credit: Revision Military

By Adam Henschke

Technologies may be able to enhance a soldier’s strength, endurance, stress tolerance and cognitive ability, but could they reduce their moral capacity to follow the laws of armed conflict?

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