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Cardiac quest: Insights from simulating the heart’s geometry and function

By Shane Huntington

Computational biologist Prof Edmund Crampin examines the challenges of creating a computational model of the human heart, and discusses what scientists have learned about the actual organ from this enterprise.

The full text of this article can be purchased from Informit.

SHANE HUNTINGTON
I’m Dr Shane Huntington. Thanks for joining us. Human beings are prolific in their use of pumps to move fluids, from large water pumps used in irrigation systems, to hand operated pumps to draw water from an underground well, pumps are an efficient way to move materials. But the most critical pump is the one brought to us by nature, the human heart.
Understanding the human heart requires more than just viewing it as a simple pump. The heart is a complex bioelectrical device that arguably exceeds the complexity of every other organ in the body except for the brain. Not only does it pump, but it requires the complexity to increase or decrease its pump speed at a moment's notice and to work in perfect harmony with its surrounding environment.
Today on Up Close, we will discuss the challenges of creating a computational model of the human heart with an expert in computational biology. Edmund Crampin is Professor of Systems and Computational Biology at the Melbourne School of Engineering at the University of Melbourne, where he also holds appointments in the Faculties of Science, and Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences. Welcome to Up Close, Edmund.

EDMUND...

The full text of this article can be purchased from Informit.