Australasian Science: Australia's authority on science since 1938

Future-Proofing Students

Future-Proofing Students

By Nicholas Wyman

Ten partnerships are piloting an innovative program that provides high school students with an industry-supported pathway to a STEM-related qualification.

The full text of this article can be purchased from Informit.

It’s not every day Year 9 students get to see and touch F/A-18 Fighter Hornets, but recently a group of students from Hunter River High School in NSW took up an invitation from BAE Systems to do just that. “Our guides showed us the insides of the hornets as well as letting us see the production line of these beasts,” said students Tiane and Gabby. “We felt so excited. We could have run a marathon. To us, this will be forever in our memory and the start of a passion for our own P-TECH journey at school.”

This is science, technology, engineering and maths (STEM) teaching in action, and it’s not a one-off. Hunter River High is one of the schools piloting the P-TECH (Pathways in Technology) program. The program borrows from a New York idea that’s expanded across the US and internationally. In Australia, it has Federal government funding and backing from the Skilling Australia Foundation. The program builds long-term partnerships between schools, industry and tertiary education institutions, and gives senior secondary students an industry-supported pathway to a STEM-related post-school qualification.

P-TECH is opening new doors by giving high school students the knowledge and skills to seek out STEM education, training and employment pathways. By providing the framework for employers to work in partnership with schools, P-TECH is helping to equip young people...

The full text of this article can be purchased from Informit.