Australasian Science: Australia's authority on science since 1938

The data cure: The changing science of biology and its impact on your health care

Molecular biologist and science policy leader Professor Keith Yamamoto discusses the current revolution in biological sciences and the emerging field of precision medicine.

The full text of this article can be purchased from Informit.

SHANE HUNTINGTON
I’m Dr Shane Huntington, thanks for joining us. Scientists have long laboured to understand life and its complex processes. Their work through the centuries has brought us all enormous benefit, from the development of drugs to treat once incurable diseases, to an increasingly sophisticated understanding of the ecological impact of human activities on the planet. As we expand our investigations into data rich fields like genomics and personalised healthcare, biology is becoming a field populated not just by biologists but also by mathematicians, physicists and statisticians. Biology as a result is changing. Naturally these changes bring the promise of better healthcare standards for people with a cancer or other life threatening conditions, as well as preventative measures to keep people well in the first place. But are we really prepared for this revolution in biology? Do we need to adjust their educational models to make sure we equip health researchers with the right skills? How will this affect the type of healthcare systems we'll have in the coming decades? To answer these questions and discuss the broader implications of a new view of biology, we are joined on Up...

The full text of this article can be purchased from Informit.