Australasian Science: Australia's authority on science since 1938

Researchers refine method to detect quantum entanglement

The full text of this article can be purchased from Informit.

RMIT quantum computing researchers have developed and demonstrated a method capable of efficiently detecting high-dimensional entanglement.

Entanglement in quantum physics is the ability of two or more particles to be related to each other in ways which are beyond what is possible in classical physics.

Having information on a particle in an entangled ensemble reveals an “unnatural” amount of information on the other particles.

The researchers’ paper, “High-dimensional entanglement certification”, is being published on Friday 17 June in Scientific Reports.

Dr Alberto Peruzzo, a senior research fellow with RMIT University’s School of Engineering and Director of RMIT’s Quantum Photonics Laboratory, said: “The method we developed employs only two local measurements of complementary properties. This procedure can also certify whether the system is maximally entangled.”

Full-scale quantum computing relies heavily on entanglement between the individual particles used to store information, the quantum bits, or qubits.

Quantum computing promises to exponentially speed up certain tasks because entanglement allows a vastly increased amount of information to be stored and processed with the same number of qubits.

Peruzzo said: “Together with this increase also comes the problem of needing to measure the device many times to find out...

The full text of this article can be purchased from Informit.