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Music and mind: Can Mozart really sharpen your neural connections?

Cognitive psychologist Prof Glenn Schellenberg scrutinises the relationship between music and cognitive development.

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DYANI LEWIS
I'm Dyani Lewis, thanks for joining us. Music is a universal component of human culture from amateur dabblings on the guitar or upright piano to gamelan ensembles in the villages of Indonesia, to Mahler symphonies performed at Carnegie Hall. It's clear that as a species, humans both individually and in groups are somehow compelled to express themselves through music. Even casual observers or listeners can be profoundly affected by music. It can make us get up and dance or it can move us to tears. It can inspire awe or it can make us reach for the off switch. But does music offer us any practical advantages? Can music change the way we think? Does listening to Mozart make us more creative or, perhaps, smarter as some would have us believe? Do music lessons, the bane of many a childhood, actually boost our IQ?To help us understand the relationship between music and mind, I am joined on Up Close today by an expert in the field of music cognition, Professor Glenn Schellenberg. Glenn is a cognitive psychologist and Professor of Psychology with the Department of Psychology, and the Faculty of Music at the University of Toronto. Professor Schellenberg is visiting Melbourne as a...

The full text of this article can be purchased from Informit.