Australasian Science: Australia's authority on science since 1938

About Australasian Science

Australasian Science is Australia’s longest-running scientific publication. It has been Australia’s authority on science since 1938 when it was first published as The Australian Journal of Science by the Australian National Research Council, which was the forerunner of the Australian Academy of Science.

In 1954 the journal was transferred to ANZAAS – the Australian and New Zealand Association for the Advancement of Science.

Throughout this time the journal published the research of eminent Australian scientists, including Sir Douglas Mawson and Sir Frank Macfarlane Burnet, whose groundbreaking clonal selection theory was published in the journal in 1957.

The journal has evolved considerably over the past seven decades. Now published as Australasian Science, it is Australia’s only monthly science magazine, and the only magazine that is dedicated to Australian and New Zealand science.

Its Patrons are Nobel Laureate Prof Peter Doherty and ABC broadcaster Robyn Williams – representing excellence in science and its communication.

The magazine's mission is to publish world-class science from the region's most inspiring minds.
Not only does Australasian Science boast the most experienced team of science journalists in Australia, it also publishes a broad range of articles from scientists writing about their own work using their own words: no hype, no spin, no bull – just the facts.

We encourage the scientists to write in plain language explaining the significance of their work to the general public. See our submissions guidelines for more details.

Australasian Science also boasts an outstanding team of columnists covering astronomy, politics, biodiversity, psychology, health, innovation, ethics, skepticism, careers, new books and media coverage.

Written in simple language, Australasian Science provides a unique local perspective on scientific developments and issues that other science magazines can’t match.

Submissions Guidelines